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Vedda people

Veddas are an indigenous people of Sri Lanka. They, amongst other self-identified native communities such as Coast Veddas and Anuradhapura Veddas, are accorded indigenous status.
According to the genesis chronicle of the majority Sinhala people, the Mahavamsa ("Great Chronicle"), written in the 5th century CE, the Pulindas believed to refer to Veddas are descended from Prince Vijaya (6th–5th century BCE), the founding father of the Sinhalese nation, through Kuveni, a woman of the indigenous Yakkha he married. The Mahavansa relates that following the repudiation of Kuveni by Vijaya, in favour of a Kshatriya-caste princess from Pandya, their two children, a boy and a girl, departed to the region of Sumanakuta (Adam's Peak in the Ratnapura District), where they multiplied, giving rise to the Veddas. Anthropologists such as the Seligmanns (The Veddhas 1911) believed the Veddas to be identical with the Yakkha.
Veddas are also mentioned in Robert Knox's history of his captivity by the King of Kandy in the 17th century. Knox described them as "wild men", but also said there was a "tamer sort", and that the latter sometimes served in the king's army.
The Ratnapura District, which is part of the Sabaragamuwa Province, is known to have been inhabited by the Veddas in the distant past. This has been shown by scholars like Nandadeva Wijesekera (Veddhas in transition 1964). The very name Sabaragamuwa is believed to have meant the village of the Sabaras or "forest barbarians". Such place-names as Vedda-gala (Vedda Rock), Vedda-ela(Vedda Canal) and Vedi-kanda (Vedda Mountain) in the Ratnapura District also bear testimony to this. As Wijesekera observes, a strong Vedda element is discernible in the population of Vedda-gala and its environs.
Veddas were originally hunter-gatherers. They used bows and arrows to hunt game, and also gathered wild plants and honey. Many Veddas also farm, frequently using slash and burn or swidden cultivation, which is called "chena" in Sri Lanka. East Coast Veddas also practice fishing. Veddas are famously known for their rich meat diet. Venison and the flesh of rabbit, turtle, tortoise, monitor lizard, wild boar and the common brown monkey are consumed with much relish. The Veddas kill only for food and do not harm young or pregnant animals. The game is commonly shared amongst the family and clan. Fish are caught by employing fish poisons such as the juice of the pus-vel (Entada scandens) and daluk-kiri (Cactus milk).
The Veddhas have a simple way of life in the jungle. Their culture is laid back and even relaxing, with their main way of life being hunted. With the impending extinction of this unique culture, however, Sri Lanka and the world stand to lose a rich body of indigenous lore and living ecological wisdom that is urgently needed for the sustainable future of the rest of mankind.
Joining the Veddhas in their village gives visitors a unique opportunity to get a firsthand experience of the Veddah’s way of life in the jungle, still free of exposure to modern technology and commercialization. Guests get to meet with Uruwarige Wanniyaleththo, Chief of the Veddhas, without whose permission guests cannot partake in any activity with the community. Upon his approval, close observation of the Veddha’s culture is possible, as is participation in some of their activities. 
Visit to Dambana and learn how the Veddhas sustain themselves through age-old hunting methods, using traditional bows and arrows. They make these bows and arrows themselves using only materials harvested from the forest. A visit to the Veddha community will give visitors the special and rare opportunity to see the "Kiri Koraha", which is one of the Veddha’s traditional forms of dance to invoke the blessings of the Gods. Then a day with veddhas people will be an unforgettable experience for your life time.

 

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